Acetyl-L-Carnitine – Can It Help You?

Acetyl-L-Carnitine – Can It Help You?

Most people don’t have a clue what acetyl-L-carnitine is. Perhaps, you see it on the vitamin shelf and think, “yeah, whatever,” if you notice it at all. However, this supplement has been getting a lot of attention for its potential benefits.

As with any supplement, medicine or treatment, there’s no one-stop-shop or magic pill for everyone and everything. We’re all different and have varied chemistries. Consequently, this means things can act differently in our bodies. That’s why it’s impossible for someone to say, “this is a 100% effective.”

That’s also why it’s important for all of us to be wise stewards of our own health. For this reason, here at neuropathydr.com we enjoy sharing potentially helpful information in hopes we can help you.

Acetyl-L-carnitine is one of those hidden gems with the potential to help many. Now, we’d like to introduce you.

How Can Acetyl-L-Carnitine Help You?

To begin with, acetyl-l-carnitine is an amino acid. In case you don’t remember from science class, amino acids are the building blocks for proteins. However, this amino acid acts differently. Acetyl-l-carnitine helps our nerve cells utilize energy and function at peak levels.

We won’t go in depth about the details of how. More importantly, we want to focus on what it can do.

Based on research across decades, acetyl-l-carnitine has emerged as effective in supporting optimal brain health. It also helps memory and much more. Beyond the brain, it has shown great promise for impacting neuropathy pain, nerve functioning, energy levels and still more.

Here is just a small list of areas acetyl-l-carnitine is being or has been researched for its beneficial properties. These have shown varied levels of effectiveness, but all are believed to show promise though more research continues to be needed.

  • Memory improvement
  • Increased energy
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Poor brain functions due to certain causes
  • Nerve pain (neuropathy)
  • ADHD, bipolar disorder, depression
  • Fragile X – decreased hyperactive behaviors
  • Fibromyalgia – improved pain

And so much more.

With the potential of this supplement, we would be doing our readers a disservice if we didn’t share.

So, is this a guarantee it will help you? No. Is there a chance acetyl-l-carnitine could help you, definitely! If you’d like to give this supplement a try today, we do offer it here solo and in topical and as part of our Metabolic Dose Packs. (REMEMBER: Reception Room Members SAVE 10% Every Day!).

As with any supplement be sure to check with your physicians before beginning.

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Better Sleep Better Neuropathy

Better Sleep Better Neuropathy

When suffering from neuropathy sleep can be difficult so let us help improve your quality of sleep!

Anybody who suffers from neuropathy or really any form of pain understands how difficult sleep can be. So often in neuropathy like so many pain conditions, sleep is never perfect. But there are often things you can do that will improve the quality of your sleep.

But before we talk about this let’s discuss why sleep is so very important.

During sleep, our body normalizes our body “cycles”. This includes everything from temperature, hormone levels, and yes even the circulation through our lungs.

These things are so very important to vital functions including our appetite and metabolism. In fact at least one study has shown by simply improving sleep quality patients lost significant weight. With neuropathy, fibromyalgia, and many forms of chronic pain, here is what we find works the best:

Number one, using your NDGen twice daily and again within two hours before bedtime helps many patients. As you improve, you’ll need to do this less often.

If you awaken during the night, simply apply the NDGen again and fall back to sleep!

In the absence of kidney disease taking some supplemental magnesium daily (not just any form but combinations like in our dose packs) and using topical magnesium like taking Epsom salts baths can really help.

*Just be very cautious not to burn yourself.

Lastly, many of our patients are now finding great improvements with our combination Metabolic Dose Packs. We designed this dietary dose pack to enhance all critical body functions, but most especially those critical to nerve function.

These key ingredients also foster good sleep and less pain.

Remember, there are no miracle neuropathy treatment formulas but when the NDGen, Metabolic dose packs, and other tools we offer are used together, this system is providing many patients with less pain, far better function, and improved sleep!

You can see and try out all of these fine products at your local NeuropathyDR your Treatment Center or HERE!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.co

Copper: Another Key Neuropathy Nutrient

Copper: Another Key Neuropathy Nutrient

Most people don’t think about copper as a key nutrient. Or in any way related to peripheral neuropathy or chronic pain. But as you’ll see, a small daily amount is necessary and essential to normal health and well-being.

Only the tiniest amounts are necessary for normal health. But like so many nutrients, lack this tiny amount, and we cannot survive.

In the human body, copper serves several roles. Perhaps the most important are our body’s ability to process oxygen, and absorb iron. Both of these functions are of course essential to life.

We only need approximately 3 mg or so per day to remain healthy. Unfortunately, excess copper more than our bodies can normally dispose of can cause a whole host of health problems, and must be avoided.

The most common source of excess copper in humans is likely from copper plumbing.

Copper levels can be measured in the blood and in the hair.

As we discussed recently, excess zinc supplementation will deplete copper, creating a mineral imbalance and the health problems that go with it. So, excess zinc supplementation will cause a copper deficiency.

This can lead to a host of health problems. There is a syndrome called myeloneuropathy in which copper deficiency causes a B12 deficiency like illness, with damage to the nerves and spinal cord.

Likewise, copper deficiency due to excess zinc, either due to supplements or poisonings like denture cream, can lead to the development of neuropathy too.

One of the key functions of copper is maintenance of normal joint and soft tissue proteins. There is no scientific evidence that copper bracelets and copper socks and the like work for arthritis, even though this was once suggested as a possible cure.

Our NeuropathyDR diet is adequate for normal intake of copper because it is high in nuts and seeds. Additional good sources include olives and avocados. Paleo sources include shellfish, beef, and lamb.

Because copper is essential for normal cellular energy and respiration, a deficiency could aggravate many underlying conditions yes including chronic pain and neuropathy.

Now you know more about this pretty metal!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Zinc and Your Health

Zinc and Your Health

As you know, zinc is a metal. It is used in a process applied to preserve metals from corrosion, especially in salt water. This of course is called galvanization. But what you may not know is that zinc also plays a large role in your health, especially neurologic and immune system-related issues.

Zinc and Your Health

Like so many nutrients, balance is everything. Too much zinc will suppress the immune system and cause difficulties with copper levels. Too little zinc can create problems ranging from memory impairment to prostate disease.

Yes, neurologic dysfunction can result when zinc is deficient. According to Hambridge et al in 2007 in “Zinc deficiency a special challenge”, it is stated that zinc is an element with “profound biologic significance”. In fact, zinc deficiencies worldwide are responsible for many disease states.

Perhaps the most important thing to understand is that zinc imbalances are relatively common. This is due both to low levels in foods of modern agriculture as well as elevated levels of copper due to plumbing and environmental sources.

In the clinic, we will measure hair and blood levels of these crucial elements when assessing nutrition status.

In our bodies, zinc can actually act as an antioxidant. This protects us against damage from environmental assaults, as well as natural aging. The presence of zinc is essential for normal nerve function.

It is well-known that zinc can speed the healing process and, in essential amounts, will help stimulate the immune system and possibly prevent prostate disease.

When zinc is used in shampoos and skin lotions, it can act as a sunscreen, a soothing dressing, and also help prevent dandruff.

The reason that zinc is so important is that it participates in many chemical reactions, especially in enzymes.

The recommended dietary allowance for zinc is around 15 mg per day. However modern diets alone sometimes fall short of this.

The good news is, the neuropathy diet that we recommend is high in nuts and seeds which provide relatively good zinc levels. Seafood, shellfish in particular, can be great sources of dietary zinc.

For most patients, safe zinc supplementation level is probably not more than 25 mg per day. More than 50 mg a day could be detrimental. Like so many nutrients, this is one area where working with your neuropathy healthcare professionals is essential if there are any questions at all about appropriate zinc dosages.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Neuropathy, Vitamin B1, and Diabetes: What You Need to Know

Neuropathy, Vitamin B1, and Diabetes: What You Need to Know

Did you know that Thiamine, or Vitamin B1, can actually improve blood sugar levels—and thus, diabetes?

Not too long ago, we spoke about a very important vitamin, and its role in neuropathy and chronic pain. This vitamin was B1, or Thiamine. As you may remember, B1 is part of the family of water-soluble vitamins, and our body storage is limited. Therefore, it is relatively easy to become deficient or suffer from low levels relatively quickly.

Perhaps the most significant cause of low thiamine in our society is the high carbohydrate diets that so many people consume. You see, thiamine is necessary for our bodies to produce energy. When we lack thiamine, a whole host of health problems can develop.

What many patients and their doctors may be ignorant of is the fact that thiamine (vitamin B1) can actually improve blood sugar levels—and, thus, diabetes.

In fact, in borderline diabetes, vitamin B1 may actually help drop blood sugars, and what is called glucose tolerance, or how our bodies handle sugar, to normal within a month.

I have even seen insulin-dependent diabetics drop their blood sugars over 200 points, one virtually overnight with as little as 25 mg of thiamine.

Like many nutrients, this is one place you really need to work with your clinicians. You and your doctors need to know that taking additional vitamin B1 can reduce need for medications, and sometimes even insulin.

This becomes even truer as you improve the overall quality of your diet. You and your doctors also should be aware that all not all vitamin B1 is created the same.

In particular we are very partial to Allithiamine. It is tolerated better than most other forms and is taken up by the body more efficiently than the common thiamine hydrochloride.

And this is precisely why that we recommend all diabetic patients get in the habit of checking their blood sugars on a regular basis.

This is also why sticking to a carbohydrate-controlled diet is essential.

The most important things to avoid are processed breads and grains, as well as sugars, soft drinks, candy, and virtually all sweets. You also need to be very careful with sugary or dried fruits. If you missed it, go back and review our last post about the NeuropathyDr Diet. We highly recommend this diet to our patients.

Some excellent sources of thiamine in the diet include tuna, sunflower seeds, pistachios, and other nuts, as well as many beans.

Be sure to add more of these to your diet on a daily basis and work closely with your healthcare professionals on optimum supplementation to help improve your diabetes!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.